Ty Segall first taste drag city The ever-fecund Ty Segall returns with yet another new album which, if you include his work with White Fence and a live album, is his fifth LP released in just over a year. One thing that is as predictable as Segall’s workrate is his ever-changing moods; from glam-stomping rock one minute to Neil Young-esque acoustic the next, he’s an artist who very simply documents playing whatever he feels. Here, he’s in rock mode, but less the high-voltage garage-rock assault of old and more a measured full-band approach. From pop-leaning tracks with accompanying brass (Whatever) to more heavy psychedelic offerings (The Fall), Segall seems just as happy to genre-hop on this record. It works as a coherent record that rockets between fuzzed-out guitars and occasional prog-like torrents of erratic melody. Daniel Dylan Wray

The ever-fecund Ty Segall returns with yet another new album which, if you include his work with White Fence and a live album, is his fifth LP released in just over a year. One thing that is as predictable as Segall’s workrate is his ever-changing moods; from glam-stomping rock one minute to Neil Young-esque acoustic the next, he’s an artist who very simply documents playing whatever he feels.

Here, he’s in rock mode, but less the high-voltage garage-rock assault of old and more a measured full-band approach. From pop-leaning tracks with accompanying brass (Whatever) to more heavy psychedelic offerings (The Fall), Segall seems just as happy to genre-hop on this record.

It works as a coherent record that rockets between fuzzed-out guitars and occasional prog-like torrents of erratic melody.

7/10

Daniel Dylan Wray

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